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IRBM working tirelessly to produce a vaccine Rete 4 – Stasera Italia – 6th March

ENGLISH TRANSCRIPT

RESEARCHER

We’re in the corridor leading to the production plant.

The production process for the potential Coronavirus vaccine.

REPORTER

We’re in Pomezia, 30 km from Rome. The drug used to prevent the spread of Ebola was first developed in these laboratories in 2014.

IRBM PRESIDENT DR. DI LORENZO

The experience we gained with Ebola was very valuable and it allows us to use the same platform that was so successful with Ebola.

REPORTER

Today, a team of researchers are one step away from producing the vaccine for

Coronavirus

RESEARCHER

We’re entering the controlled access production area. Every operator enters a personal code and then dons additional clothes because we’re entering a protected environment where we’re working with the virus, with the cells.

REPORTER

The exclusive images you are seeing were supplied by the researchers.

Access to this part of the laboratory is forbidden.

RESEARCHER

This room, called PASS-BOXS, is where the first 1000 doses of the potential vaccine will be produced and held in containers like this.

RESEARCHER

We are working on developing a potential vaccine for Coronavirus that uses a carrier, which is a system for conveying a message to the patient’s cells containing instructions to teach our immune system, the patient’s immune system, how to recognize the virus and defend us from it.

IRBM PRESIDENT DR. DI LORENZO

We expect to start production in one or two weeks at most, so that animal trials on mice can start in June.

If all goes well, by July we’ll have produced enough doses to start human trials.

Out of every 100 research projects that are launched, statistically 1 or 2 reach their goal.

Those 1 or 2 have to cover the costs of the other 98 or 99 that went wrong. The costs range between 1 and 1.3 billion dollars.

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